Missouri Native Plants

Interested in buying plants native to Missouri? Missouri is home to a huge variety of beautiful plant species well-suited to the local climate and soil conditions. And they help local wildlife, too! So, if you're looking to add some local flavor to your garden or landscape, buying plants native to Missouri is a great way to do it. 

On this page, you'll find a Missouri native plants list. You'll also get some info on the benefits of using plants native to Missouri and tips for planting them. So, whether you're a seasoned gardener or a first-time plant buyer, explore our list of Missouri native plant collections and start adding some local beauty to your outdoor space.

Not sure if these collections are right for your Missouri garden? Try searching for native plants by ZIP code instead! And if you’re not in Missouri, you can shop for native plants by state!

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Carolina Rose Shrub

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$69.00
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Pollinator Picnic Plant Collections (I)

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from $108.00
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$108.00
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Hummingbird Heroes Plant Collections (I)

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from $68.00
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Pollinator Power Plant Collections (I)

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from $68.00
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Orange Butterfly Milkweed Plant Sets (I)

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from $42.00
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Great St. John's Wort Plant Sets

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from $42.00
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$42.00
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Swamp Milkweed Plant Sets

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from $42.00
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Snowy Milkweed Plant Sets

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from $42.00
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from $42.00
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Hummingbird Haven Plant Collections (I)

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from $108.00
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from $108.00
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$108.00
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Rain Garden 12-Plant Collection

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$108.00
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$108.00
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$108.00
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Purple Pollinator Pleaser 12-Plant Collection

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$108.00
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$108.00
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$108.00
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butterfly icon
You’ll help birds, pollinators such as bees, butterflies, other insects, amphibians and small mammals, and reptiles.
globe icon
Your impact reaches far beyond your own garden. You’ll be creating habitat for declining wildlife, but also helping to reduce urban heat islands and manage storm water runoff.
house icon
Bring nature home. There’s no easier place to get a daily dose of nature and the physical, mental and spiritual benefits.
hands holding a plant icon
All orders support our non-profit mission to help declining wildlife and expand native plant availability nationwide.
butterfly icon
You’ll help birds, pollinators such as bees, butterflies, other insects, amphibians and small mammals, and reptiles.
glove icon
Your impact reaches far beyond your own garden. You’ll be creating habitat for declining wildlife, but also helping to reduce urban heat islands and manage storm water runoff.
house icon
Bring nature home. There’s no easier place to get a daily dose of nature and the physical, mental and spiritual benefits.
hand holding a plant icon
All orders support our non-profit mission to help declining wildlife and expand native plant availability nationwide.
butterfly icon
You’ll help birds, pollinators such as bees, butterflies, other insects, amphibians and small mammals, and reptiles.
globe icon
Your impact reaches far beyond your own garden. You’ll be creating habitat for declining wildlife, but also helping to reduce urban heat islands and manage storm water runoff.
house icon
Bring nature home. There’s no easier place to get a daily dose of nature and the physical, mental and spiritual benefits.
hand holding a plant icon
All orders support our non-profit mission to help declining wildlife and expand native plant availability nationwide.
butterfly icon
You’ll help birds, pollinators such as bees, butterflies, other insects, amphibians and small mammals, and reptiles.
globe icon
Your impact reaches far beyond your own garden. You’ll be creating habitat for declining wildlife, but also helping to reduce urban heat islands and manage storm water runoff.
house icon
Bring nature home. There’s no easier place to get a daily dose of nature and the physical, mental and spiritual benefits.
hand holding a plant icon
All orders support our non-profit mission to help declining wildlife and expand native plant availability nationwide.

Introduction to Missouri native plants

Missouri is home to an incredible number of stunning native plants that can be found in its rugged rolling hills, lush valleys, and meandering rivers. Missouri native flowers are unique in that they have evolved to survive the state’s variable weather conditions, from humid summers and mild winters to severe storms. That evolution also means they’re a vital resource for local wildlife, particularly pollinators, which are vital for the health of Missouri’s biodiversity.

Whether you’re looking for something new to spruce up your landscape or just want to appreciate the beauty of Missouri’s natural environment, consider adding Missouri native plants to your next garden project!

 

FAQs about native plants in Missouri

Missouri native plants are a fantastic way to attract pollinators into the garden and give them a safe haven.

Adding wildflowers and other plants native to Missouri to your garden provides food sources and habitats for pollinators and other wildlife. Knowing what attracts pollinators is essential when creating habitat gardens that support ecological health. With careful consideration and planning, your Missouri native plant garden can become an oasis for local wildlife!

Some parts of Missouri are already doing incredibly well. For example, St. Louis is emerging as a leader in ecological landscaping. Native plants are being planted throughout the area by ordinary citizens who want to positively impact their neighborhood and the surrounding environment.

If you want your native plants to thrive, it's important to consider the planting location. Missouri is generally recognized as having four planting zones, with most of the state falling in the central zone (zone 6). However, there are some slight variations, with the northern region being in zone 5b, the central regions in zones 6a and 6b, and some parts of the southern region in zone 7a.

When deciding where to plant your native plants, consider the amount of sunlight and shade in your garden. Plants and sunlight go hand-in-hand, and the amount of sun your garden gets will directly impact the health and growth of your plants. Get the right plants in the right location, and your native plants will thrive. Try using our ZIP code native plant finder to discover the perfect native plants for your specific garden.

Missouri native plants can be planted in containers, but there are some factors to consider. First, before you buy native flowers and plants, it’s important to think about the type of container you plan to grow them in. Choosing the right size and type of container for each plant you want to grow is key!

Plants with deep roots may need a larger container, while shallow-rooted plants can do well with smaller pots. Selecting a well-drained container is essential for preventing waterlogging and root rot. With the proper considerations, Missouri plants and flowers can be enjoyed all year round!

No matter the size of your outdoor space — whether it's a balcony garden or a vast expanse of land — plants native to Missouri can be a beautiful and beneficial addition to your landscape. These local plants can offer colorful blooms and fruits that nourish and shelter a diversity of creatures, including butterflies, birds, and other wildlife. Native plants are well-suited to the local climate and soils and typically require minimal watering and no fertilizer.

These plants have evolved in Missouri's geological and climatic conditions for millenia, and have done so alongside local wildlife to create complex and vibrant ecosystems. By cultivating native plant communities, we can help protect and support the region's biodiversity and resist non-native invasive species that threaten the habitats of native creatures and crops.

Considering the negative impacts of conventional lawns, such as air and water pollution and the overuse of chemicals, the anti-lawn movement is gaining traction. At Garden for Wildlife, we actively support the anti-lawn movement!

For example, did you know a lawn mower can emit as much pollution in one hour as a car driving 100 miles, or that lawn mowers consume around 580 million gallons of gasoline each year? That doesn’t even account for the 17 million gallons of gasoline spilled onto the ground during refilling annually!

Then there’s the fact that between 30 to 60% of urban freshwater is used in lawn care, and 67 million pounds of pesticides are used on US lawns annually. By replacing lawns with native plants, we can promote healthier and more sustainable environments for both humans and wildlife.

Not only do monarch butterflies breed in and migrate through Missouri, the state is an important part of their migration route. As a result, Missouri has become a key part of the US efforts for monarch conservation.

Monarch butterflies face numerous threats to their survival, including habitat loss and climate change. As their breeding and feeding grounds are disrupted, their population numbers have plummeted. This is where organizations like Missourians for Monarchs come in.

This collaboration of governmental, agricultural, and conservation groups is working hard to create and protect monarch habitats. They hope to provide safe resting spots for the butterflies in fields and gardens, which will support the monarch population during their long journeys.

Milkweed plants are essential for monarch survival and also support other pollinators and wildlife. By conserving and creating more breeding and feeding grounds, we can help support a diverse and healthy ecosystem.

So, the next time you see monarch butterflies outside your window, remember the incredible journey they embark upon. By protecting their habitats and planting native plants in Missouri that sustain monarchs, we can all play a part in supporting the monarch butterfly population.

Invasive non-native plants have become a big issue in Missouri. Many of these non-native plants were introduced into the United States from other parts of the world for various reasons, including ornamental value, feeding livestock, erosion control, and even for providing food for wildlife. Some invasive species even arrived in Missouri by accident!

However, due to the lack of natural control, such as through insects, diseases, and grazing animals that would typically keep these plants in check, some have spread uncontrollably.

The Missouri Department of Conservation has recognized the importance of addressing this issue and has provided a comprehensive guide to invasive species in Missouri. To combat the negative impact of invasive non-native plants, it’s crucial to promote the use of plants native to Missouri in gardens and natural areas.

It's important to note that not all non-native plants are detrimental to the biodiversity of Missouri. Some non-native species can even contribute positively to ecosystems in the state.

But by using a Missouri native plants list to identify the best native wildflowers, shrubs, and grasses, we can help restore the natural balance and beauty of Missouri's landscapes while also providing essential habitats for native wildlife.

The Callery pear, also known by its popular cultivar, Bradford pear, has become one of the most invasive plants in Missouri. Yet, the Missouri Noxious Weed Law only identifies 12 species of plants that threaten agricultural land, none of which are the Callery pear.

Unfortunately, it is not illegal to sell Callery pear. As a result, many nurseries continue to stock it, including large stores with national purchasing programs. While the law mandates that landowners control or eradicate noxious weeds, there simply aren't enough resources to enforce it. The Missouri Invasive Plant Task Force is currently reviewing the spread of invasive species statewide to make research-based recommendations regarding new rules.

As individuals, we can also take action to stop the spread of invasive plants. We can spread the word about the impacts of invasive species and advocate for solutions at all levels of our community. We can contact city officials, legislators, and the governor to express our thoughts on Callery pear and other invasive species. By working together, we can help protect the biodiversity of Missouri's natural ecosystems and ensure the survival of native plant species.