Massachusetts Native Plants

FAQs about native plants in Massachusetts

Help Massachusetts wildlife and enjoy the beauty of nature when you add one of our curated native plant collections outside your home. When you introduce Massachusetts native plants into your garden, you’ll help local wildlife to thrive!

New England is one of the most diverse regions in the US, and Massachusetts is as eclectic as it comes. The rich biodiversity of Massachusetts covers everything from forests and wetlands to salt marshes and other coastal habitats. When you buy native plants for Massachusetts, you help restore the health of this beautiful state.

Not sure if these are the right native Massachusetts plants for your garden? Try shopping by zip code with our native plant finder. Not in Massachusetts? Then shop native plants by state.

Summer Songbird Plant Collections (I)

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from $68.00
Sale Price
from $68.00
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$68.00
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per 

Monarch Munchables 6-Plant Collection

Regular Price
$68.00
Sale Price
$68.00
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$68.00
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per 

Pollinator Picnic Plant Collections (I)

Regular Price
from $108.00
Sale Price
from $108.00
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$108.00
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per 

Spring Bee Buffet 6-Plant Collection

Regular Price
$68.00
Sale Price
$68.00
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$68.00
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per 

Grayleaf Goldenrod Plant Sets

Regular Price
from $42.00
Sale Price
from $42.00
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$42.00
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per 

Merry Monarchs Plant Collections (I)

Regular Price
from $108.00
Sale Price
from $108.00
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$108.00
Unit Price
per 

Great St. John's Wort Plant Sets

Regular Price
from $42.00
Sale Price
from $42.00
Regular Price
$42.00
Unit Price
per 

Summer Songbird Plant Collections (II)

Regular Price
from $108.00
Sale Price
from $108.00
Regular Price
$108.00
Unit Price
per 

Monarch Munchables 18-Plant Collection

Regular Price
$148.00
Sale Price
$148.00
Regular Price
$148.00
Unit Price
per 

Rain Garden 12-Plant Collection

Regular Price
$108.00
Sale Price
$108.00
Regular Price
$108.00
Unit Price
per 
butterfly icon
You’ll help birds, pollinators such as bees, butterflies, other insects, amphibians and small mammals, and reptiles.
globe icon
Your impact reaches far beyond your own garden. You’ll be creating habitat for declining wildlife, but also helping to reduce urban heat islands and manage storm water runoff.
house icon
Bring nature home. There’s no easier place to get a daily dose of nature and the physical, mental and spiritual benefits.
hands holding a plant icon
All orders support our non-profit mission to help declining wildlife and expand native plant availability nationwide.
butterfly icon
You’ll help birds, pollinators such as bees, butterflies, other insects, amphibians and small mammals, and reptiles.
glove icon
Your impact reaches far beyond your own garden. You’ll be creating habitat for declining wildlife, but also helping to reduce urban heat islands and manage storm water runoff.
house icon
Bring nature home. There’s no easier place to get a daily dose of nature and the physical, mental and spiritual benefits.
hand holding a plant icon
All orders support our non-profit mission to help declining wildlife and expand native plant availability nationwide.
butterfly icon
You’ll help birds, pollinators such as bees, butterflies, other insects, amphibians and small mammals, and reptiles.
globe icon
Your impact reaches far beyond your own garden. You’ll be creating habitat for declining wildlife, but also helping to reduce urban heat islands and manage storm water runoff.
house icon
Bring nature home. There’s no easier place to get a daily dose of nature and the physical, mental and spiritual benefits.
hand holding a plant icon
All orders support our non-profit mission to help declining wildlife and expand native plant availability nationwide.
butterfly icon
You’ll help birds, pollinators such as bees, butterflies, other insects, amphibians and small mammals, and reptiles.
globe icon
Your impact reaches far beyond your own garden. You’ll be creating habitat for declining wildlife, but also helping to reduce urban heat islands and manage storm water runoff.
house icon
Bring nature home. There’s no easier place to get a daily dose of nature and the physical, mental and spiritual benefits.
hand holding a plant icon
All orders support our non-profit mission to help declining wildlife and expand native plant availability nationwide.

FAQs about native plants in Massachusetts

While it's true that native plants will attract and support healthy insect populations in your garden, this isn't necessarily a bad thing. In fact, attracting beneficial insects is one of the main reasons to plant natives in the first place.

These insects will provide essential food for birds and other animals, helping to create a more diverse and balanced ecosystem in your yard. For example, if you want to attract hummingbirds to your garden, they’ll need insects to feed on.

Of course, if you're concerned about attracting pests, there are plenty of Massachusetts native plants for sale that are known to be resistant to insect damage. So whatever your goals for your garden, there's sure to be a native plant perfect for you.

Massachusetts has extremely diverse ecological systems with a range of gardening zones. In the Berkshire mountains, most areas are in Zone 5a, while Cape Cod is in Zone 7a. Generally, most of western Massachusetts is in Zone 5b, while most of the coastline has been classified as Zone 6b. It can get confusing!

This diversity in climate and geography means that Massachusetts is home to a wide variety of native plants. From delicate wildflowers to towering evergreens, there are Massachusetts native plants to suit any landscape. And with more awareness about the importance of conserving local ecosystems, Massachusetts native plants are increasingly popular choices for home gardens.

Whether you’re looking for native plants for sale or simply want to learn more about Massachusetts's unique botanical heritage, there are plenty of resources available. So get out there and explore all that Massachusetts has to offer!

Massachusetts is home to a variety of different soil types. The state has sandy soils, loamy soils, and clay soils, and each type of soil has its benefits and drawbacks. For example, sandy soils drain well and are easy to work with, but they can also be easily eroded by wind and water.

Loamy soils are a mix of sand, clay, and organic matter. They are easy to work with and retain moisture well, making them ideal for growing plants. However, they can sometimes be too dense for roots to penetrate.

Clay soils are rich in nutrients and often stay moist, but they can be difficult to work with and can compact easily. Don’t forget that there’s some great advice available about testing your soil in Massachusetts, so don’t think you have to do everything yourself. There’s plenty of help available!

No matter what type of soil you have in Massachusetts, there are native plants that will thrive in it. You can buy native plants more easily than ever: simply check out the collections above!

Massachusetts is home to a diverse array of plant life, including many native species vital to the state's ecosystem. However, Massachusetts also has a problem with non-native invasive plants. These plants are not native to the state, and they often crowd out native species, disrupting the ecosystem.

Some of the most common non-native invasive plants in Massachusetts include Japanese knotweed, garlic mustard, and oriental bittersweet. Residents can help to control the spread of these invasive non-natives by buying native plants for their gardens and landscaping. By planting natives, you can help to preserve the state's unique ecosystems.

The short answer is no — you don't need it. Here's why. Native plants have adapted to the climate and soil conditions in Massachusetts, so they don't need additional nutrients to survive. Using a fertilizer can actually harm native plants because they have evolved to develop deep root systems that help them access nutrients deep in the soil.

Using fertilizer weakens these root systems, making your plants more susceptible to drought and pests.

People often think they need to use harmful pesticides and fertilizers to have a beautiful, healthy lawn or garden. But that's not the case! In Massachusetts, we're lucky to have an abundance of native plants that are perfect for our climate and support our local pollinators.

By simply planting a few Massachusetts native flowers, shrubs, and trees, you can create a landscape that is not only beautiful but also provides vital habitat for bees, butterflies, fireflies, and other pollinators. And the best part is that you don't have to use any harmful chemicals to do it! So next time you're pondering new plants to add to your garden, consider Massachusetts native plants. Your lawn or garden will thank you — and so will the pollinators!